Archive for August, 2005

En France

Sunday, August 21st, 2005 | Uncategorized | 1 Comment

And so, for the first time in far too long, I am on a little mini-holiday. Nothing speciql – just Pqris;;; bloody French keyboard. Nothing special – just Paris, then the Loire Valley and back to Paris for a second weekend.

All very last minute – I got a call last week saying one of my oldest friends is leaving Paris to return to the United States (so I have a friend in New York now – excellent). Her leaving party was on Saturday at the Pot de Terre and so a very pleasant evening was spent chatting to old friends and making new ones.

And that’s it really. I would upload some photos from Paris (I didn’t have a digital camera when I lived here), but my friend’s computer runs on Linux, and you have to do something fancy with the USB connection. In the week, maybe.

Ahhhh – no work to fret about. Nice.

A question

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2005 | Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Does it make you bad son if, say, you’re vaguely aware that your parents’ wedding anniversary is sometime in August and you have to look up the date on your family tree – only to find out that it’s this coming weekend, it’s their ruby wedding anniversary, you haven’t got anything for them yet and anything you do buy has to be sent to them overseas?

Must dash. I’m off to the greetings card shop.

English?

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2005 | Uncategorized | Comments Off on English?

London accent changing forever as a result of hip-hop

The rap and Afro-Caribbean speech being adopted by Londons teenagers is
creating an irreversible change in the capital’s accent as well as a minefield for lexicographers, according to the author of the Cambridge Encyclopaedia of English Language.

——

English-English Lexicon of Teen Speak

The first version of an online guide to youth-speak for the not-so-young, which the BBC hopes to add to and update at regular intervals.

——

Uptalk becoming standard speech in US

Once the preserve of teenage girls in Australia and California, uptalk – the practice of ending sentences on a rising note – is fast becoming part of standard American speech, says a New York professor.

flaneur AT flanerie.co.uk

Free counter and web stats

Pages

literature